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The English Utilitarians

Cheapness is the sentence of death to the producer on a small scale who has no money to invest in the purchase of machinery that his rich rivals can easily procure. Cheapness is the great instrument in the hands of monopoly; it absorbs the small manufacturer, the small shopkeeper, the small proprietor; it is, in one word, the destruction of the middle classes for the advantage of a few industrial oligarchs.
— John Stuart Mill
Socialism
Competition is the best security for cheapness, but by no means a security for quality. In former times, when producers and consumers were less numerous, it was a security for both. The market was not large enough nor the means of publicity sufficient to enable a dealer to make a fortune by continually attracting new customers: his success depended on his retaining those that he had; and when a dealer furnished good articles, or when he did not, the fact was soon known to those whom it concerned, and he acquired a character for honest or dishonest dealing of more importance to him than the gain that would be made by cheating casual purchasers.
— John Stuart Mill
Socialism
The utilitarian moral approach can be factorized into three distinct elements: (1) consequentialism (judging all choice variables, e.g. actions or policies, entirely in terms consequent of states of affairs); (2) welfarism (judging states of affairs entirely in terms of personal utility information relating to the respective states); and (3) sum-ranking (judging personal utility information entirely in terms of their sum-total).
— Amartya Sen
Choice, Welfare, and Measurement (page 28)

TBD